In the previous tutorial, we not only managed to set up our base project and get it running on http://localhost:8080, but we also managed to build it so that it’s ready for deployment to production. We now have a strong base project from which we can build up up our HackerNews clone.

In this tutorial, we are going to create our first Single Page component which will be our Navbar.vue component. I’ll show you how you can subsequently register this component within your Vue application and we’ll also look at how we can customize the way our component looks by using CSS that is only applied to said component.

By the end of this tutorial, you should be comfortable building your own simple, single-page components within Vue.js.

Video Tutorial

This tutorial is available in video format. Should you wish to support the series then please subscribe and like the video on YouTube!

A Simple Navbar Component

So, the first thing I always notice whenever I open up HackerNews is the iconic orange navbar at the top. This will undoubtedly have to feature in our own clone, and in order to add it, we’ll have to create the Navbar component we talked about earlier.

Open up your project in a text editor of your choice and open the directory that your project exists within. Create a Navbav.vue file within the /src/components/ directory and add the following:

<template>
    <div class="pure-menu pure-menu-horizontal">
        <div class="container">
        <a href="#" class="pure-menu-heading pure-menu-link">Home</a>
        <ul class="pure-menu-list">
            <li class="pure-menu-item"><a href="#" class="pure-menu-link">News</a></li>
            <li class="pure-menu-item"><a href="#" class="pure-menu-link">Sports</a></li>
            <li class="pure-menu-item"><a href="#" class="pure-menu-link">Finance</a></li>
        </ul>
        </div>
    </div>
</template>

<script>
export default {
  name: 'Navbar'
}
</script>

<style scoped>
.pure-menu {
    background-color: #E17842;
}
.pure-menu a {
    color: white;
}
</style>

The above code represents the bare-bones of our new Navbar component. We define the HTML we wish to render for our component within the <template> tags, we define all of our core component functionality, a.k.a. all of the JavaScript functions within the <script> tags. Finally, should we wish to add custom styling to our Navbar component, we can do so by placing the css within our <style> tags. You should notice we’ve added scoped to our style tag, this essentially ensures that the css we define within this component will only impact the HTML within our component.

I’ve populated the <template> tags with a simple navbar element stolen from the pure-css documentation page just to get us started.

Most Vue.js single-page components follow this structure with a <template> section for your HTML, a <script> section for your components core code, and a <style> section for when you wish to customize the look of your component.

Registering our New Component

So, now that we’ve defined our Navbar.vue component, it’s time to register it within our existing Vue.js application and start using it. As it stands, our Vue.js application doesn’t have any reference to our new Navbar.vue component so we’ll have to first import it into the component we wish to render it and then register it within the components property of our particular Vue.js component.

In this case, we are going to be importing our Navbar.vue component into our App.vue component. We want our Navbar.vue component to be shown across every route of our application, so importing it into this App.vue component and rendering it in one place makes sense.

Open up your /src/App.vue component file and within the <script> tag, import your Navbar and add it to a components object like so:

import Navbar from '@/components/Navbar'
export default {
  name: 'App',
  components: {
    Navbar
  }
}

Once we have imported and registered this new component, we can use it within our App.vue’s HTML by adding the <navbar> to our app and removing the <helloworld> tag from our <template> section.

<template>
  <div id="app">
    <navbar></navbar>
  </div>
</template>

Our Vue.js application infers automatically that the <navbar> HTML tag corresponds to the Navbar component we have registered within our components property. However, should you wish to explicitly state the element you wish to correspond to a component, you can do so like this:

import Navbar from '@/components/Navbar'
export default {
  name: 'App',
  components: {
    'navbar': Navbar
  }
}

Our finished src/App.vue file should look like this:

<template>
  <div id="app">
    <navbar></navbar>
    <router-link/>
  </div>
</template>

<script>
import Navbar from '@/components/Navbar'
export default {
  name: 'App',
  components: {
    Navbar
  }
}
</script>

<style>
</style>

Adding a CSS Framework

Pretty much every web application you see will utilize some form of CSS framework. Now, for this project, I’m choosing to use the Pure-CSS framework as it seems relatively lightweight whilst featuring essentials such as a grid system, and I haven’t had much of a chance to play about with it yet.

In order to add a CSS framework to our project, open up the index.html page within your project and add:

<link rel="stylesheet" href="https://unpkg.com/[email protected]/build/pure-min.css" integrity="sha384-nn4HPE8lTHyVtfCBi5yW9d20FjT8BJwUXyWZT9InLYax14RDjBj46LmSztkmNP9w" crossorigin="anonymous">

To just below your <title> tag. Upon clicking the cmd-s you should see your application reload on http://localhost:8080 with a slightly different style.

How it looks

At this stage, your application should look something like this:

Our HackerNews clone as it stands

Next Steps

Now that we’ve defined a few, very simple components within our application, it’s time to move on and start thinking about how we can show different views within our application. This is where the vue router will come into play!

Next Tutorial: Part 3 - Adding Routes to our Vue.js Application


Tutorials


Part 2 - Creating a Few Components Logo
Part 1 - Setting Up Our VueJS Project
3 Minutes

In this tutorial, we are going to be setting up our basic project that will form the base of our HackerNews clone

Published: Monday, Mar 19, 2018
Part 2 - Creating a Few Components Logo
Part 2 - Creating a Few Components
5 Minutes

In this tutorial, we are going to be creating a few components to our HackerNews clone and fleshing out our project.

Published: Monday, Mar 19, 2018
Part 2 - Creating a Few Components Logo
Part 3 - Adding a Few Routes To Our App
4 Minutes

In this tutorial, we are going to setting up our application to use the vue router and add a few simple routes to our application.

Published: Monday, Mar 19, 2018
Part 2 - Creating a Few Components Logo
Part 4 - Hitting The HackerNews API
5 Minutes

In this tutorial, we are going to start hitting some APIs and showing some of the top stories on our HackerNews clone.

Published: Monday, Mar 19, 2018
Part 2 - Creating a Few Components Logo
Part 5 - Viewing Individual News Articles
6 Minutes

In this tutorial, we are going to add some more routes and components to our application to view individual news items and the comments

Published: Monday, Mar 19, 2018
Part 2 - Creating a Few Components Logo
Part 6 - Advanced Components
5 Minutes

In this tutorial, we are going to split out our application into more components and use some of the more advanced features such as props and transitions.

Published: Monday, Mar 19, 2018
Part 2 - Creating a Few Components Logo
Part 7 - Managing State with Vuex in your VueJS Applications
6 Minutes

In this tutorial, we are going to look at how you can manage state within your VueJS applications using vuex

Published: Monday, Mar 19, 2018
Part 2 - Creating a Few Components Logo
Building a HackerNews Clone in VueJS
2 Minutes

In this series we look at how you can build your own HackerNews clone using Vue.JS

Published: Monday, Mar 19, 2018